Wardrobe Editing
comment 1

How to French Cuff your Jeans

Last week I thought I was onto something new when I hurriedly cuffed my jeans, accidentally tucking in one of the sides on the way. It suddenly looked très chic, tailored, as if Emmanuelle Alt had shared a single French It Girl secret with my right leg.

I’ve since learned that French cuffing, or peg rolling, has been around at least since this August 1985 issue of Seventeen Magazine. Look at all that glorious denim. Then enjoy some free, noncommital tailoring that shows off your shoes:

WEARING: J BRAND STRAIGHT WHITE JEANS
On sale at Nordstrom, Shopbop, and Amazon.

MY VERY FAVORITE WHITE JEANS:
PAIGE DENIM ‘SKYLINE’ CROP SKINNY
Nordstrom, Saks, Amazon. Also love Paige Verdugos in all rinses!

And if you’re curious why cuffed pants exist, Wikipedia does not disappoint:

  • The main reason for cuffs is to add weight to the bottom of the leg to help the drape of the trousers.
  • Parents use cuffs to extend the life of children’s clothes by cuffing pants that are too long and unrolling as the child grows.
  • Originally, however, it started as men rolling trousers to avoid getting mud splashed on them when roads were still unpaved.

The more you know.

  • John

    This is NOT a “French Cuff.” It is Peg Cuff”. French Cuff is for shirts, not pants.